FishUpdate Briefing Friday October 5th

WATCHING FISH MAY “CALM NERVES”
CAN a cod keep you calm? Scientists at The  Deep  in Hull are trying to prove if watching fish, turtles and sharks is beneficial for our health. Experts from York and Exeter universities have been  carrying out the experiment on visitors to the giant aquarium. Volunteers wear headsets, which track their brain activity and heart rate while watching the marine life. Many people say they feel calm and relaxed while viewing fish and other sea creatures swim around. The experiment was  part of the British Science Festival.

BIG CUTS IN MACKEREL QUOTAS LOOMING
THE International Council for the Exploration of the Sea has recommended large scale cuts on the North Atlantic mackerel quotas for next year which, if implemented in full  will hit fishermen from Scotland, Iceland and Norway particularly hard. Overall, ICES is calling for a reduction of at least 42 per cent.  Scotland’s Pelagic Fishermen’s Association chief executive Ian Gatt said the proposed  cuts were of “huge concern” and he would be meeting European Commission officials today to discuss them. Mackerel is worth more than £160-million a year to the Scottish fleet. Norway’s Fishing Vessel Owners Federation has also said the proposals were far too high.

SEAFOOD BOOK PUBLISHED POSTHUMOUSLY
A book on the seafood industry  by  the well known Canadian  restaurateur John Bil, (crrct) who died at the beginning of the year  has been published posthumously. Bil, who had been suffering from cancer, ran the restaurant Ship To Shore in Darnley Prince Edward Island and also had other establishments in Montreal and Toronto, managed to complete  the manuscript for his book “Ship To Shore: Straight Talk From the Seafood Industry”  shortly before his death. His widow Sheila Flaherty said he husband, who was well known in the seafood industry,  was never one to sit still. The book is published in Canada by House of Anansi Press.

FAROESE FISH EXPORTS DROP
FISH exports from the Faroe islands have declined  during the first seven months of this year. They were down by 13 per cent in value and four per cent in volume. Exports for farmed salmon, for example, totalled 33,358 tons, a decrease of 4,900 tons on the same period last year. The total value of all seafood sold overseas amounted to £490-million, a decrease of £76-million. However, Faroese fishermen earned more from selling cod and haddock this time around .

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