FishUpdate Briefing Friday June 30th

CHINA SNAPS UP MORE ALASKAN SEAFOOD
CHINA is looking beyond Norway to secure quality seafood supplies. It is now poised to become major  customer for Alaska salmon,  according to a new report. The Alaska Sea Grant report says sales from the northerly US state to China are running at almost $800-million or 54 per cent of its total  seafood exports, thanks to growing prosperity among China’s rapidly growing middle class. It means a sizeable proportion of its 1.4 billion people have significant disposable income to spend on more high-end foods, such as salmon.

GRADUATES EYE UP CAREERS IN FISH FARMING
MORE Norwegian university students are choosing aquaculture as a career option, new figures show. The Norwegian Universities and Colleges Admission Service (NUCAS) says that numbers have almost trebled over the past four years and says the increase is largely due to the increased knowledge about fish farming and the potential it offers young people. While the majority of applications came from areas where fish farms already existed, there was also increased interest from students in the cities.

YOUNG’S STAFF GET FITNESS BUG
GRIMSBY-based Young’s Seafood has been  marking  Health and Wellbeing week with a host of free activities to help boost health awareness among staff. As part of the Healthy Workplace Programme, a wide-ranging roster of activities at Young’s Grimsby sites were  built around the key themes of fitness, occupational health and mindfulness.  The programme will allow staff to join fitness classes to help improve physical and emotional wellbeing, as well as take part in a mindfulness and meditation class. Staff  also  the chance to find out their fitness age, using a medical grade body analyser that delivers results in 15 seconds, as well as check their blood pressure. The initiative is followed by Young’s Seafood winning the Healthy Workplace Programme Platinum Award, in recognition of the business’ continued efforts to promote a better working environment.

STRIKE DENTS FISH CARRIER EARNINGS
EIMSKIP, the big Icelandic  shipping and fish transport company saw its revenue grow by almost 30 per cent during the first quarter of this year.
But it  believe it would have been even higher had it not been for the Icelandic fishermen’s strike. The company had admitted that the 10 week long dispute  did have an impact on performance. Revenue for the three month period to the end of March was 146.9 million euros, up by 33.7 million euros or 29.7 per cent which, says Eimskip, was down to good organic growth and strong performance from new acquisitions. However, Eimskip, which has a base on the Humber near Grimsby,  said there was a negative impact from the

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