Fish Update Briefing, Friday, March 31

SOUTH KOREAN FISH FARM OUTPUT DOWN

OUTPUT from fish farms in South Korea fell slightly last year, government figures have shown. It is thought a reduction in demand for seafood among South Koreans is behind the decline, in part for health reasons. There was a widespread cholera scare last year due to undercooked seafood. The figures show local fish farms produced 80,151 tonnes of products in 2016, down 6.2 per cent from the previous year’s 85,448 tonnes, according to the data by Statistics Korea. But because of increased prices the overall value was up by just under one per cent.

 

HERRING WORKS REBORN AS ART GALLERY

AN old herring works in Reykjavik, Iceland, dating back to 1949 has been turned into an impressive art gallery, thanks to the fishing company HB Grandi. The building has been unused since HB Grandi’s fishmeal and fish oil production in Reykjavík came to an end. Now the Marshall Building houses the Nýlistasafn art collection, the artist-run platform Kling & Bang, Danish-Icelandic artist Ólafur Elíasson’s Reykjavík studio and the Marshall restaurant and bar. The company said its project management team was on hand to assist the architects and designers.

 

LICENCE THREAT TO SEAFOOD BRAWL RESTAURANT

A NEW York seafood restaurant which was the scene of a major brawl last month, with chairs flying around the building, may now lose its drinks licence, said the New York Daily News. The paper has learnt that the owners of Seafood City on City Island have been summoned by the state liquor authority to explain themselves. The brawl on the night of February 23 was captured on video and went around the United States.  Diners were filmed using chairs as weapons and shields. The incident has also been raised by local politicians, who have expressed differing views on whether the restaurant should lose its licence.

 

NOVA SCOTIA ENJOYING SEAFOOD BOOM

THE port of Halifax in Nova Scotia, Canada, is enjoying a big boom in trade thanks to a surge in seafood exports to the rest of the world. The Halifax port authority said seafood packed containers are luring many new shipping companies. Karen Oldfield, chief executive of the authority, said the value of seafood exports is becoming increasingly important. Half of Nova Scotia’s $2.1 billion in food exports is seafood destined for the United States, but it is a figure that’s increasingly worrisome for the province, with President Trump’s threat to tear up the North American Free Trade Agreement.

 

 

Related Posts:

Comments are closed.