Fish Update Briefing, Friday, July 7

ICELAND MACKEREL SEASON OFF TO GOOD START

ICELAND’S mackerel season has started well, according to the fishing company HB Grandi, whose pelagic vessels Venus and Víkingur have switched from catching blue whiting. The Vikingur caught 600 tonnes on its second mackerel trip while the Venus is currently on the fishing grounds and should return with a good catch. The Vikingur’s skipper, Róbert Axelsson, says the mackerel is of top quality with an average weight of 390 grammes. So far, few other Icelandic pelagic boats have gone in search of mackerel as they are still fishing blue whiting.

 

SNOW CRAB QUOTA SET AT 4,000 TONNES

NORWAY’S Ministry of Food and Industry has set a total quota of 4,000 tonnes of snow crab for 2017. Of the total quota, 500 tonnes will be allocated to any agreements with other countries. Fisheries Minister Per Sandberg said: ‘Snow crab is an exciting new species that has the potential to become a valuable resource. We are committed to managing it properly and sustainably.’ The total quota is determined on the basis of biological advice from the Institute of Marine Research.

 

FISH FRESH EVEN AFTER TWO WEEKS

FISH almost two weeks old can be sold as fresh provided it is stored and handled correctly, says Norway’s industry watchdog. Researchers at Nofima, the country’s food research institute, followed a consignment of cod from the quayside to the fish counter in supermarkets in Germany. They checked and measured fish quality through all stages of production and the transport chain.  Grete Lorentzen at Nofima in Tromsø told the broadcaster NRK: ‘We measured the temperature at different times. This, together we with the contents of the so-called total volatile nitrogen, which is what we experience as bad smell. The results show that filleted cod kept superb quality, even after 12 days. If the fish is whole it could stay fresh for 13 or 14 days.’

 

ANCIENT SALMON TRAP DISCOVERED

A prehistoric fish trap constructed of rock walls has been discovered near the mouth of a salmon stream on Alaska’s Kodiak Island. The trap is in a lower inter-tidal zone that is covered by ocean water at high tide and exposed at low tide, reports the local newspaper, the Kodiak Daily Mirror. Archaeologists at the Alutiiq Museum in the city of Kodiak identified the trap. Salmon at high tide could swim into the stream, and when the tide receded, fish would be stranded in one of two corrals, said Patrick Saltonstall, the museum’s curator of archaeology.

 

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