Fish Update Briefing, Friday, July 14

FISH MINISTER DEMANDS MORE NORWEGIAN SALMON IN SUSHI

NORWAY’S fisheries minister, Per Sandberg, says he wants to see more Norwegian salmon used in the production of Japanese sushi. Speaking after a recent visit to Japan, he said it was an important market for his country’s seafood, but there was still room for expansion, both in terms of Norwegian fish and seafood technology. It was only relatively recently – 1985 – that the first exports of salmon from Norway reached Japan. Sandberg said there was scope for a closer dialogue between the two countries.

 

MARINE ECONOMIST LANDS EURO ROLE

A SENIOR economist at Seafish, Arina Motova, has been elected vice-president of the European Association of Fisheries Economists (EAFE) at their 2017 conference in Dublin. Seafish described it as a great reflection of the esteem in which Motova is held by her fellow professionals and means that, even after Brexit, Seafish economists will remain influential throughout Europe as they try to ensure high standards in fisheries economics research and reporting, along  with offering  advice and evidence to inform business and policy decisions.

 

US SEAFOOD FIRMS IN SUSTAINABLE PARTNERSHIP

A GROUP of nine North American seafood companies has announced a partnership with the Conservation Alliance for Seafood Solutions, in an effort to increase seafood sustainability. Called Sea Pact, the group says its experience and supply chain knowledge can be of great help and value to the alliance by working together to further improve the sustainable seafood development. Sea Pact was founded just four years ago as a collaboration between Albion Fisheries, Fortune Fish and Gourmet, Ipswich Shellfish Group, Santa Monica Seafood, Seacore Seafood, Stavis Seafood, JJ McDonnell and A.C. Covert, and Seattle Fish Co.  It says it is very proud to have been able to join the alliance.

 

BANGLADESH EATING 30% MORE FISH

A NEW study shows that people in Bangladesh are now eating 30 per cent more fish than they did 20 years ago, but they are getting a lower amount of important nutrients from it. The reason is down to the type of fish being eaten. Changes are taking place in Bangladesh where the volume of naturally harvested fish is falling. Now a combination of overfishing, pollution and environmental damage has led to significant losses in both quantities of fish and in the number of fish species. But the good news is that the growth in aquaculture will eventually compensate for this loss.

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